Carneval

GROUP WORK  /  EVENT DESIGN  /  CONCEPT  /  XGD  /  BRANDING

This project is the result of a workshop under the facilitation of Michael Ellsworth of Civilization. Given the prompt of addressing a social issue, my group of three worked to conceptualize an event to combat factory farming. My contributions included the concept and event flow, typography, brochure, box information layout, copywriting, presentation layouts, logotype and branding.

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OVERVIEW

An event to evoke empathy and understanding for the lives of livestock.

Shock value doesn’t work long term. To instill lasting change in an individual and culture, creating connections and establishing relationships is key. On the subject of factory farming, this is no exception. 

Hearing a figure is one thing; experiencing it is another. By creating an enclosure for humans that echoes the space factory farmed animals are forced to live within, it fosters a more keen perspective on how little room these animals have.

BRANDING

We aimed to create an event that was engaging and welcoming despite addressing a rather dreary issue, which would both draw in passersby and help to expose the dichotomy of factory farming: what you see isn’t what you get.

By channeling carnival and wood type styles, we created a system of branding that was both flexible and reminiscent of a fun occasion notorious for its dark side. The box / face-in-hole opportunity paired with our stylistic choices to drive the carnival theme home and made for a catchy event name that invited curiosity: Carneval.

THE BOX

The whole premise of the event was to draw people into a box that scaled up the reality that factory farmed animals live every day. We concepted a 3' x 3' x 7' enclosure that would reflect the uncomfortable spaces these animals live in on the inside, while on the outside it would serve as a welcoming, even celebratory display of information and graphics. The outside would not serve as a strong indication of what's inside, but that's the thing with factory farming: there is a complete disconnect between experiences.

The outside does not reflect the inside, just as the burger you bought is not indicative of how that animal lived.

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We used the outside of the box as a dimensional way to display different areas of information. This gave us a chance to touch on a number of issues and potentially resonate with a variety of people.

PHOTO OP The front of the box would draw in even those initally apathetic toward factory farming. People would be excited to share images of their friends as cows, and learn about the issues in the process.
EMPATHY This side breaks down some of the ways in which farm animals are not so different from us, or our pets, and poses some important questions in doing so.
CTA The back of the box (door to the inside) serves as a dreary reminder of the acts that take place every day, and suggests that there is an alternative.
DICHOTOMY To contrast the inviting exterior, the inside of the box is dark, gloomy, and echoes the experiences of a factory farmed animal.
ISSUES; COMBATTING Here we expose some of the things that go on before food hits the store, so that ignorance can no longer be an excuse. More importantly, we provide some conscious shopping methods that help to combat factory farming.

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BROCHURE

Available to anyone walking by, the brochures breakdown the issues while providing clear, tangible alternatives. We provided a list of local stores and eateries that serve free range, organically-farmed products as a way to facilitate consumers' moves into shopper consciousness.

A large aspect of our workshop was creating and presenting a proposal and pitch for Michael. Check them out here.

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If you're into the dope illustrations and iconic work involved here, check out my homies Sean Williams and Meg Frendt!